Climate of the Nation 2014 Are Australians climate dinosaurs?

Synopsis

Jun 23, 2014 - 11:00am

Are Australians climate dinosaurs? Climate of the Nation 2014, benchmarking Australian attitudes to climate change, finds that political leaders risk being stuck in the past as public attitudes on climate change and its solutions are on the rebound. 


In mid-2014, more Australians think that climate change is occurring and are concerned about impacts, present and future. There is a rebound in desire to see the nation lead on finding solutions and a strong expectation of government to address the climate challenge.

 

Opposition to carbon pricing has continued to decline and there is a decline in the minority supporting repeal. For the first time more support carbon pricing than oppose it, even though there is lingering confusion around it. 

Here you can find the full report as well as detailed factsheets, infographics and VoxPop videos of people on the street in Sydney talking about climate change. Click here for the report press release. 

CoN2014 dino cover
Read Report
CoN2014 Feature Image Vox
CEO John Connor discusses the mood of the nation in the introduction to this year's report.
We asked people “What proportion of our energy should we get from renewable sources by 2020?”
We asked people "What three words come to mind when you think about climate change?"
Leadership views are strong this year, with women and younger Australians most strongly supportive.
Download a SlideShare presentation on the latest public opinion polling.
Ads urging Parliament to keep the existing carbon laws, which are already delivering results.

 Factsheets


Preferred Energy Sources
 (PDF 60KB)
This factsheet looks at Australians' preferred energy sources.

Demographic Highlights (PDF 51KB)
This factsheet provides some insights into male vs female attitudes and explores differences at how younger and older generations view climate change.  

Concern About Impacts of Climate Change (PDF 75KB)
This factsheet looks at regional differences on attitudes towards various impacts.

Responsibilities, Performance and Carbon Pricing (PDF 63KB)
This factsheet looks at who Australians think is responsible for leading action on climate change and how those groups are performing. Political parties' performance is discussed.

 

 Other Videos


Climate of the Nation 2012
- Overview

The Climate Institute's CEO John Connor discusses the report's key findings.

Climate of the Nation 2012 - Polling Review
Stuart Clark of Ipsos Social Research Institute discusses the quantitative (polling) approach and key findings.

 

Presentation

 

Review or download the key findings on SlideShare.

 

Qualitative + Quantitative Background

Key quantitative questions behind Climate of the Nation 2012, from polling conducted by Ipsos Social Research Institute.

Final qualitative report underpinning Climate of the Nation 2012, conducted by JWS Research.

 

 Thanks  

 
This project was conducted in partnership with Pacific Hydro. The text contributions by Net Balance and GE are also appreciated. 

- See more at: http://www.climateinstitute.org.au/climate-of-the-nation-2012.html/section/479#sthash.SeHhoSKV.dpuf

 Factsheets


Preferred Energy Sources
 (PDF 60KB)
This factsheet looks at Australians' preferred energy sources.

Demographic Highlights (PDF 51KB)
This factsheet provides some insights into male vs female attitudes and explores differences at how younger and older generations view climate change.  

Concern About Impacts of Climate Change (PDF 75KB)
This factsheet looks at regional differences on attitudes towards various impacts.

Responsibilities, Performance and Carbon Pricing (PDF 63KB)
This factsheet looks at who Australians think is responsible for leading action on climate change and how those groups are performing. Political parties' performance is discussed.

 

 Other Videos


Climate of the Nation 2012
- Overview

The Climate Institute's CEO John Connor discusses the report's key findings.

Climate of the Nation 2012 - Polling Review
Stuart Clark of Ipsos Social Research Institute discusses the quantitative (polling) approach and key findings.

 

Presentation

 

Review or download the key findings on SlideShare.

 

Qualitative + Quantitative Background

Key quantitative questions behind Climate of the Nation 2012, from polling conducted by Ipsos Social Research Institute.

Final qualitative report underpinning Climate of the Nation 2012, conducted by JWS Research.

 

 Thanks  

 
This project was conducted in partnership with Pacific Hydro. The text contributions by Net Balance and GE are also appreciated. 

- See more at: http://www.climateinstitute.org.au/climate-of-the-nation-2012.html/section/479#sthash.SeHhoSKV.dpuf

Factsheets 

Responsibility, Performance & Leadership (PDF, 646 KB) - Factsheet examining who Australians think is responsible for leading action on climate change and how those groups are performing. 

Renewable Energy & Ideal Energy Mix (PDF, 683KB) - Factsheet  outlining views on renewable energy and preferred energy sources, including demographic and regional breakdowns. 

Views on Carbon Pricing & Direct Action (PDF, 481KB) - Factsheet outlining views on carbon pricing and Direct Action. 

Demographic Highlights  (PDF, 896KB) - Factsheet providing insights into male vs female attitudes and exploring differences in how younger and older generations view climate change.  

Geographic Differences in Views  (PDF, 703KB) - Factsheet outlining geographic differences in attitudes, including urban vs rural/regional views and key distinctions in attitudes in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland. 

Background Materials

Quantitative Survey   (PDF)
Questionnaire behind  Climate of the Nation 2014  results, as conducted by JWS Research. 

Election Day Exit Polling  (PDF)
Factsheet detailing the findings of Election Day exit polling.  

 Thanks  

This project was conducted with support from:

  • Dara Fund No. 2 (a sub fund of the Australian Communities Foundation)
  • Poola Charitable Foundation (Tom Kantor Fund)
  • European Climate Foundation
        

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